Whitman College

Faculty News Briefs

  1. New Faculty News Briefs page

    Whitman’s Faculty News Briefs can now be found on the main Whitman website.

    For up-to-date Faculty News Briefs, please visit:
    http://www.whitman.edu/faculty-news-briefs

     
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  2. John D. Cotts, associate professor of history and chair of the history department, has published a new book titled “Europe’s Long Twelfth Century: Order, Anxiety and Adaptation, 1095-1229.” The book was released Nov. 9, 2012 by Palgrave Macmillan. According to the description, between 1095 and 1229, Western Europe confronted a series of alternative cultural possibilities that would fundamentally transform its social structures, its intellectual life and its very identity. It was a period of difficult decisions and anxiety rather than a triumphant “renaissance.” Cotts shows how new social, economic and religious options challenged Europeans to re-imagine their place in the world; provides an overview of political life and detailed examples of the original thought and religious enthusiasm of the time; and presents the Crusades as the century’s defining movement.

     
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  3. Dave Glenn, retired professor of music, has been invited to China to adjudicate, perform and give music clinics.  He will arrive in Shanghai on Nov. 22 and adjudicate and perform at the First China Jazz Education Festival on Nov. 23 and 24. Next he will travel to ChuZho and give jazz workshops at ChuZhou College on Nov. 25 and 26. Also, Glenn has been selected to be on the Board of Directors for Jazz Education Abroad, an organization dedicated to promoting international jazz education exchanges.

     
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  4. Robert Sickels, professor of film and media studies, reports that his documentary short, “Sterling Hallard Bright Drake”, is screening at the St. Louis International Film Festival, which is an Academy Award qualifying festival. The documentary short was made by Sickels and Zack Ellenbogen ’12; their collaboration was supported by a Perry Grant. It recently played at the SNOB Film Festival in Concord, NH, and at the Northwest Filmmakers’ Festival at Whitsell Auditorium at the Portland Art Museum. Ellenbogen attended the Portland screening and hosted a Q&A after the film; Sickels will do the same in St. Louis, where the film will screen at the 440-seat Tivoli Theatre as part of the Doc Shorts: Longevity program.

     
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  5. Michelle Acuff, assistant professor of art, is hosting a solo exhibition at Bellevue College from Nov. 14 to Dec. 5. The opening for her show, titled Surrogate, will be this Wednesday, Nov. 14 from 3-7 p.m. at the Bellevue College Gallery Space, Room D271.

     
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  6. Sudharshan Seneviratne, Edward F. Arnold Visiting Professor of South Asian Archaeology, is the recipient of the 2013 Conservation and Heritage Management Award. Presented by the Archaeological Institute of America and its Conservation and Site Preservation Committee, the award recognizes Seneviratne for his extensive work on heritage initiatives in Sri Lanka. He will accept the award at the January 2013 meeting of the Archaeological Institute of America, which will be held in Seattle. Also, Seneviratne’s upcoming talk is on the topic for which he is being honored. “Corridors of Heritage for Peace and Conflict Resolution” will take place Nov. 14 at 7:30 p.m. in Maxey Auditorium. Click here for more information.

     
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  7. James Winchell, adjunct assistant professor of foreign languages, recently published a new article in Tablet Magazine. Titled “Kafka’s Yom Kippur Appeal,” it marks the centenary of the writing, in one night, of Kafka’s “The Judgment.” Kafka also composed the beloved modernist masterpiece, The Metamorphosis, during the weeks after this High Holiday. Winchell examines what, if anything, the close proximity of Rosh Hashanah and Yom Kippur means to these narratives.

     
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  8. Elizabeth Vandiver, Clement Biddle Penrose Associate Professor of Latin and Classics and Chair of the Classics Department, has published an essay on the Greek historian Herodotus in a new Oxford University Press collection. Her essay, “‘Strangers are from Zeus’: Homeric Xenia at the Courts of Proteus and Croesus” forms Chapter 5 of the volume Myth, Truth, & Narrative in Herodotus, eds. Emily Baragwanath and Mathieu de Bakker, Oxford 2012.

     
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  9. Roberts among finalists for poetry category of Washington State Book Award

    Katrina Roberts, Mina Schwabacher Professor in English and the Humanities, is among finalists for the poetry category of this year’s Washington State Book Award (formerly the Governor’s Writers Awards). Each year, the Seattle Public Library’s Washington Center for the Book selects six outstanding books published by Washington authors. Roberts was recognized for her acclaimed book of poems, “Underdog” (University of Washington Press 2011).

     
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  10. Forsthoefel, Vernon return from presentations in Vienna

    Nancy Forsthoefel, research associate and adjunct instructor of biology, and Dan Vernon, professor of biology, recently returned from Vienna, Austria, where they each gave presentations at the 23rd International Conference on Arabidopsis Research (ICAR). ICAR is an annual meeting of more than 800 plan biologists who work on Arabidopsis, a small weed that serves as the main model species for plant genome research worldwide.  Both presentations focused on Arabidopsis PIRL genes, a family of genes discovered in the Vernon/Forsthoefel lab at Whitman. Forsthoefel’s featured her work with genetically modified plants expressing altered versions of the PIRL9 gene, and Vernon’s focused on three PIRL genes that function in the formation of pollen. Recent graduates Carrie Reinhart ’11 (Biology) and Lauren Brougham ’12 (Biochemistry, Biophysics and Molecular Biology) were coauthors on Vernon’s presentation.

     
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